The Plastic Plesiosaurus Problem and a Somewhat Successful Solution

Whenever you buy a bag of cheap dinosaurs there’s always a few aquatic ones in there that have limited use. That’s unless you’re into really ancient naval wargaming which is an untapped niche I think. I’ve always kept them in a bag because like most people in this hobby I have the uncontrollable urge to hoard everything.

I have recently been thinking about ‘big bads’ for Deathzap, existential threats to the human race. The Qydran Enclave are one, the Vandrakkar another, but it’s always fun to have more existential threats, so I’ve turned my attention to what I’m currently calling ‘the Void’. I suppose they’re ghosts, but not quite. Here’s a few WIP.

The Void look like your classic manifestation albeit with a tar like substance leaking from any wounds, their eyes and mouth. The things on the right are ‘Widows’, they accompany the void troops and spread terror among the enemy ranks. They’re just screw plugs draped in loo roll, and are supposed to look like your very classic white sheet ghost.

I wanted to add something else to the force and I considered your classic reaper, something deadly in melee, but it all seemed a bit too normal. So I covered those pesky plesiosaurs in toilet paper instead:

After a couple of layers they felt durable enough. Any bits that seemed too flimsy were toughened up by painting a layer of super glue on.

I painted the top bits white and the undersides black. The white was shaded with citadel’s contrast paint Apothecary white.

I think it gives a nice creepy effect, and the thought of these things floating around above my head makes me feel rather uncomfortable, especially considering their size compared to my human figures.

I thought it needed a little bit more so I added blood around the edges.

I really like these things. I don’t know what they do yet. If you have any ideas post a comment. I’m hoping to cook up some game mechanics that really emphasise the otherworldliness of this force, I don’t like how daemons in Warhammer 40k don’t seem all that scary or even very dangerous. I guess it’s hard to come up with a stat line for what should be unfathomable.

4 thoughts on “The Plastic Plesiosaurus Problem and a Somewhat Successful Solution

  1. As usual you do some very clever stiff with very little,
    I would say that the targets of these creatures do a terror test, at least if they are assaulting them or being assaulted by them. Then they have the appropriate results if they fail.
    I would give the creatures multiple wounds and attacks. They float over obstacles or maybe even go through them.
    Maybe individual humans have psychic powers that counter the beasties (if they have a supernatural element).

  2. Another alternative would be to have them normally ‘insubstantial’ where some troops might be able to see them, but they would drift, almost randomly. Then each move roll a dice and they would drop into reality, perhaps on a 6 on a d6. Any figure they were within an inch off was automatically removed from the table, and whilst they’re real they could change their direction of drift. They could also be targeted and would be comparatively easy to kill. Next turn they drop out of reality and drift in the new direction, rolling to see if they drop back into reality again 🙂

  3. I know they are meant to be scary, but to be honest I can’t shake off a feeling that they are giant duvets, and I quite fancy the idea of one dropping onto me! But… well, if they are meant to be actual corporeal monsters that can fight, then how about some teeth/tentacles/claws on the underside? They could swoop for 1 round of combat every now and then. If not, and they are ethereal, then maybe they would interfere with the shields of any troops that they hover over, rather than cause any damage directly. Maybe they could be controlled from the ground, so you have to assign a figure to direct them (and maybe they have a control range) – if that figure is killed, then they go random like rampaging elephants in ancients!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s